Difference between revisions of "Chicago Python Workshop/Setup/Linux interactive Python"

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{{Chicago Python Workshop/Setup/Linux interactive Python}}
Linux ships with Python installed, so the goal of this page is to make sure you can start a terminal and run Python from the command line.
 
 
<ol>
 
<li>Open a Terminal command prompt. You can find the Terminal application at Applications/Accessories/Terminal, or it may already be on your menu bar.</li>
 
<li>To start Python, type
 
 
<pre>
 
python
 
</pre>
 
 
at the comand prompt and hit enter. You should see something like
 
<pre>
 
Python 2.7.1 (r252:60911, Jan 24 2011, 17:44:40)
 
[GCC 4.3.2] on linux2
 
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
 
>>>
 
</pre>
 
 
The <code>>>></code> indicates that you are at a Python prompt.</li>
 
<li>Exit the Python prompt by typing
 
 
<pre>
 
exit()
 
</pre>
 
 
and hitting enter. Now you're back at the Linux command prompt (which looks something like <code>jesstess$</code>).</li>
 
</ol>
 
 
===Success!===
 
 
Practice these steps until you feel comfortable navigating to a command prompt, starting Python, and exiting Python.
 

Latest revision as of 17:06, 9 December 2012

Linux ships with Python installed, so the goal of this page is to make sure you can start a terminal and run Python from the command line.

  1. Open a Terminal command prompt. You can find the Terminal application at Applications/Accessories/Terminal, or it may already be on your menu bar.
  2. To start Python, type
    python
    

    at the comand prompt and hit enter. You should see something like

    Python 2.7.1 (r252:60911, Jan 24 2011, 17:44:40) 
    [GCC 4.3.2] on linux2
    Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
    >>> 
    
    The >>> indicates that you are at a Python prompt.
  3. Exit the Python prompt by typing
    exit()
    
    and hitting enter. Now you're back at the Linux command prompt (which looks something like jesstess$).

Success!

Practice these steps until you feel comfortable navigating to a command prompt, starting Python, and exiting Python.