Editing Open Source Comes to Campus/Curriculum/Licensing

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== Copyleft licenses ==
 
== Copyleft licenses ==
  
However, the Free Software Foundation, and many others, highly suggest using a copyleft license instead. This family of licenses includes the GPL line (which in turn includes three GPL versions, the LGPL, and the AGPL), the CDDL, and the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, among others. They have one thing in common: if you receive a copy of a work under their terms, you may only distribute copies of it, and copies of any derivative works, under the exact same terms. (Some copyleft licenses specify "compatible licenses", but these are the only acceptable variations.)
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However, the Free Software Foundation, and many others, highly suggest using a copyleft license instead. This family of licenses includes the GPL line (which in turn includes three GPL versions, the LGPL, and the AGPL), the CDDL, and the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, among others. They have one thing in common: if you receive a copy of a work under their terms, you may only distribute copies of it, and copies of any derivative works, under the exact same terms. (Some copyleft licenses specify "compatible licenses", but there are the only acceptable variations.)
  
 
Many people think that this family of licenses is inherently flawed. The nature of copyleft licenses makes it impossible to use projects licensed that way in non-free works, which is legally possible with projects with permissive licenses. To that end, many modern programmers, especially in the open source movement, have eschewed the copyleft family and licensed all of their work under MIT or BSD licenses. While the cause may not be immediately obvious, there has also been a rise in re-use of free projects in commercial projects.
 
Many people think that this family of licenses is inherently flawed. The nature of copyleft licenses makes it impossible to use projects licensed that way in non-free works, which is legally possible with projects with permissive licenses. To that end, many modern programmers, especially in the open source movement, have eschewed the copyleft family and licensed all of their work under MIT or BSD licenses. While the cause may not be immediately obvious, there has also been a rise in re-use of free projects in commercial projects.

Please note that all contributions to OpenHatch wiki are considered to be released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) (see OpenHatch wiki:Copyrights for details). If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly and redistributed at will, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource. Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

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