Big picture (Feb 2011): Difference between revisions

imported>Paulproteus
imported>Paulproteus
* A forum+mailing list where people discuss what they like and don't like about the site.
 
=== Actionable: Problems with the volunteer opportunity finder (and suggested changes) ===
 
The purpose of the volunteer opportunity finder is to help people make their first open source contribution. I'm most interested in the target audience of people with no solid social connection to other contributors, largely because I believe that helping those people is the ticket out of the community's diversity problems.
* Some people want to submit drive-by patches. Other people want to join a project and start a commitment. I think that this should be a big question as you reach the volunteer opportunity finder: which one do you want? And we can help projects make it clear which one ''they'' are interested in, also.
 
=== Most projects don't want to put in the time to encourage participation; how can we help projects that do want new contributors highlight that? ===
 
=== Actionable: Making the site more useful to existing project members who want new contributors ===
I think the above is the biggest question for OpenHatch. As a goal, it's not important that OpenHatch have a website at all. If all the projects could just communicate consistently, clearly, and instructively to new contributors, then they would all get more contributors.
 
But there are some resources that make sense for projects to ''share''. For example, projects don't always write their own git tutorials; they link to existing ones.
 
In addition, there are things that not all project maintainers ''know''. Bitesize bugs are one cultural thing that some projects do that others probably haven't even thought about. Another is telling new contributors that their emails will get answered within four days.
 
=== Events (AKA, Asheesh thinks people don't follow things they read) ===
 
I think that IRC-based tutorials on "How to run your project well?" in which people chat with OpenHatch people about how they could run their project well would go a long way.
 
When running the Penn workshop, I saw that there was a huge amount of interest from students who wanted to do something neat with open source.
 
=== Making the site more useful to existing project members who want new contributors ===
 
This is my response to glyph's feedback.
* Goal: glyph wishes more projects had a clear "This is exactly what you do to submit a patch" page.
** Fix: We should make the presence of such a page part of the ranking of projects. We should make sure that we say it's okay if your page is hosted on your site. We should provide a reasonable template, and make it easy for people on OpenHatch discuss these pages on the forums. (I think we'll get some high-quality feedback from a community of people who hang out on the OpenHatch forums/mailing list just because they like to talk about what makes a good "How to submit a patch" page.)
 
=== Rambling: Most projects don't want to put in the time to encourage participation; how can we help projects that do want new contributors highlight that? ===
 
I think the above is the biggest question for OpenHatch. As a goal, it's not important that OpenHatch have a website at all. If all the projects could just communicate consistently, clearly, and instructively to new contributors, then they would all get more contributors.
 
But there are some resources that make sense for projects to ''share''. For example, projects don't always write their own git tutorials; they link to existing ones.
 
In addition, there are things that not all project maintainers ''know''. Bitesize bugs are one cultural thing that some projects do that others probably haven't even thought about. Another is telling new contributors that their emails will get answered within four days.
 
=== Rambling: Events (AKA, Asheesh thinks people don't follow things they read) ===
 
I think that IRC-based tutorials on "How to run your project well?" in which people chat with OpenHatch people about how they could run their project well would go a long way.
 
When running the Penn workshop, I saw that there was a huge amount of interest from students who wanted to do something neat with open source.
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