Boston Python Workshop 3/Friday/Linux project dependencies

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ColorWall[edit]

Download the ColorWall project[edit]

You'll be writing graphical effects for an existing ColorWall project. Download this ColorWall code and example effects so you're ready to start working with them tomorrow:

  1. Create a new folder called ColorWall on your Desktop
  2. Save the following files to the ColorWall folder:

Test the ColorWall code[edit]

Start a command prompt and navigate to the Desktop/ColorWall directory where the ColorWall code lives. For example, if the ColorWall project is at /home/jesstess/Desktop/ColorWall,

cd /home/jesstess/Desktop/ColorWall

will change you into that directory, and

ls

will show you the source code files in that directory. One of the files is "run.py", which has a ".py" extension indicating that it is a Python script. Type:

python run.py

at the command prompt to execute the run.py Python script. You should see a window pop up and start cycling through colorful effects. If you don't, let a staff member know.

Now type:

python run.py -a -s

at the command prompt to execute the run.py Python script so that it runs only the advanced effects. You should see a window pop up and start cycling through different colorful effects. If you don't, let a staff member know.

You can also run both sets of effects by typing:

python run.py -a

Success![edit]

You've completed setup for the ColorWall project.

Wordplay[edit]

Download the Wordplay project[edit]

We've written some skeleton code for the Wordplay project already. Download this code so you're ready to start working with it tomorrow:

  1. Create a new folder called Wordplay on your Desktop
  2. Save the following files to the Wordplay folder:
    1. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/sowpods.txt
    2. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/scrabble.py
    3. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/scrabble_cheater.py
    4. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/words1.py
    5. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/words2.py
    6. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/words3.py
    7. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/words4.py
    8. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/words5.py
    9. http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Wordplay/words6.py

Test the Wordplay code[edit]

Start a command prompt and navigate to the Desktop/Wordplay directory where the Wordplay code lives. For example, if the Wordplay project is at /home/jesstess/Desktop/Wordplay,

cd /home/jesstess/Desktop/Wordplay

will change you into that directory, and

ls

will show you the source code files in that directory. One of the files is "words1.py", which has a ".py" extension indicating that it is a Python script. Type:

python words1.py

at the command prompt to execute the words1.py Python script. You should see a column of English words printed to the screen. If you don't, let a staff member know.

Success![edit]

You've completed setup for the Wordplay project.

Twitter[edit]

Download and extract the Twitter project dependencies[edit]

  1. Click and save these four dependencies to your Desktop:
  2. The ".zip" extension on the above files indicates that they are compressed Zip archives. We need to "extract" their contents. To do this, double-click on each file. This will create a directory for each file, containing the source code for the dependency.

Install the Twitter project dependencies[edit]

Each of these 4 dependencies has an installer script that we'll need to run at a command prompt to install the software. It is important that the dependencies are installed in the order listed above. For each project, start a command prompt and navigate to the Desktop directory where the source code lives. For example, if the httplib2-0.6.0 project was extracted to /home/jesstess/Desktop/Twitter/httplib2-0.6.0,

cd /home/jesstess/Desktop/Twitter/httplib2-0.6.0

will change you into that directory, and

ls

will show you the source code files in that directory. One of the files is "setup.py", which has a ".py" extension indicating that it is a Python script. Type:

sudo python setup.py install

type in your password, and hit enter to install httplib2.

Navigate to the 3 other dependency directories and run

sudo python setup.py install

in all of them to install those dependencies as well.

If you get an error like:

ImportError: No module named setuptools

you need an extra package. Type:

sudo apt-get install python-setuptools

We've written some skeleton code for the Twitter project already. Download this code so you're ready to start working with it tomorrow:

  1. Create a new folder called Twitter on your Desktop
  2. Save http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Twitter/twitter_api.py to the Twitter folder.
  3. Save http://mit.edu/jesstess/www/BostonPythonWorkshop3/Twitter/util.py to the Twitter folder.

Test the Twitter code[edit]

Start a command prompt and navigate to the Desktop/Twitter directory where the Twitter code lives. For example, if the Twitter project is at /home/jesstess/Desktop/Twitter,

cd /home/jesstess/Desktop/Twitter

will change you into that directory, and

ls

will show you the source code files in that directory. One of the files is "twitter_api.py", which has a ".py" extension indicating that it is a Python script. Type:

python twitter_api.py --search=python

at the command prompt to execute the twitter_api.py Python script. You should the text from 20 tweets containing the word "Python" printed to the screen. If you don't, let a staff member know.

Success![edit]

You've completed setup for the Twitter project.

« Back to the Friday setup page